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Hashimoto's, the root cause?

Hashimoto's is the most common cause of hypothyroidism. The condition causes white blood cells and antibodies to mistakenly attack the cells of the thyroid.

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Hashimoto's and autoimmunity

Hashimoto's thyroiditis is an autoimmune disorder, which means it occurs when immune cells attack healthy tissue instead of protecting it.

In the case of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, immune cells mistakenly attack healthy thyroid tissue, causing inflammation of the thyroid.

If Hashimoto's thyroiditis attacks your thyroid to the point that the gland can no longer produce enough thyroid hormones for your body to function properly, then you will develop hypothyroidism.

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Causes of Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

Doctors aren't entirely sure why the immune system, which is supposed to defend the body from harmful viruses and bacteria, sometimes turns against the body's healthy tissues.

Some scientists think a virus or bacterium might trigger the response, while others believe a genetic flaw may be involved. A combination of factors — including heredity, sex and age — may determine your likelihood of developing the disorder.

The Effects Of hashimoto's On Your Body

You might not notice signs or symptoms of Hashimoto's disease at first, or you may notice a swelling at the front of your throat (goiter). Hashimoto's disease typically progresses slowly over years and causes chronic thyroid damage, leading to a drop in thyroid hormone levels in your blood. The signs and symptoms are mainly those of hypothyroidism.

hashimoto symptoms

Menstrual changes

Women with hypothyroidism may have irregular periods and changes in menstrual flow. Fertility can be affected too, making it harder to get pregnant

Mental health issues

Low thyroid hormone levels can contribute to depression and sadness

Jaundice

Infant born with Hypothyroidism may have jaundice, ht eyellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes

Dry skin

Low thyroid hormone levels directly affect the skin. This can cause a variety of changes, including dryness, thickening, and scaling

Weakness

Low thyroid hormone production can leave your muscles weak, achy or stiff

Heartburn

Hypothyroidism slows digestion. This can lead to heartburn and other gastrointestinal issues

Stomach bloating

A lack of thyroid hormone slows the movement of food through your digestive tract, which can leave your belly bloated

Slow metabolism

Too little thyroid hormone sows the body's metabolism, which can lead to weight gain

High blood pressure

Low Thyroid hormones levels can increase blood pressur through interactions with the blood vessels and circulatory system

Eyebrow thinning

Hypothyroidism can make you lose eyebrow hair. The hair loss usually starts at the outer edges of your brows.

Brain fog

Hypothyroidism can affect your memory and your ability to think clearly. This mental fuzziness is sometimes called "brain fog"

Constipations

slowed movement of food through your intestines can back up stool, making you constipated

Gallstones

Hypothyroidism may increase your risk of gallstones, hard pieces made up of substances like cholesterol or bile that form in your gallbladder

Heart attack risk

Hypothyroidism may increase cholesterol levels and narrow arteries. This could contribute to an increased risk of heart attack.

Goiter

A goiter is an abnormally enlarged thyroid gland that can happen in people with diseases like Hashimoto thyroiditis.

Peripheral neuropathy

hypothyroidism that isn't treated can interfere with how the nerves send signals to and from your brain, spinal cord, and body.

Thinning hair

The effects of hypothyroidism can cause you to lose  hair on your scalp, face and body

prevalent hashimoto's symptoms

Menstrual changes

Women with hypothyroidism may have irregular periods and changes in menstrual flow. Fertility can be affected too, making it harder to get pregnant

Constipations

slowed movement of food through your intestines can back up stool, making you constipated

Gallstones

Hypothyroidism may increase your risk of gallstones, hard pieces made up of substances like cholesterol or bile that form in your gallbladder

Heart attack risk

Hypothyroidism may increase cholesterol levels and narrow arteries. This could contribute to an increased risk of heart attack.

Goiter

A goiter is an abnormally enlarged thyroid gland that can happen in people with diseases like Hashimoto thyroiditis.

Peripheral neuropathy

hypothyroidism that isn't treated can interfere with how the nerves send signals to and from your brain, spinal cord, and body.

Thinning hair

The effects of hypothyroidism can cause you to lose  hair on your scalp, face and body

Brain Fog

Hypothyroidism can affect your memory and your ability to think clearly. This mental fuzziness is sometimes called "brain fog"

hypothyroidism symptoms common

Weakness

Low thyroid hormone production can leave your muscles weak, achy or stiff

Dry skin

Low thyroid hormone levels directly affect the skin. This can cause a variety of changes, including dryness, thickening, and scaling

Heartburn

Hypothyroidism slows digestion. This can lead to heartburn and other gastrointestinal issues

Stomach bloating

A lack of thyroid hormone slows the movement of food through your digestive tract, which can leave your belly bloated

Slow Metabolism

Too little thyroid hormone sows the body's metabolism, which can lead to weight gain

High blood pressure

Low Thyroid hormones levels can increase blood pressur through interactions with the blood vessels and circulatory system

Jaundice

Infant born with Hypothyroidism may have jaundice, ht eyellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes

Eyebrow thinning

Hypothyroidism can make you lose eyebrow hair. The hair loss usually starts at the outer edges of your brows.

Mental health issues

Low thyroid hormone levels can contribute to depression and sadness

online hashimotos treatment

The Hashimoto's diagnostic

While Hashimoto's disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States, not all people with the disorder develop hypothyroidism. Hashimoto's is typically diagnosed by a combination of your signs, symptoms, and blood tests.

Detecting Hashimoto’s disease requires looking for another marker: thyroid peroxidase antibody, or TPOab.

Thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOab) are key signs of Hashimoto’s disease. Why? Because if you have this thyroid disease, the immune system uses these thyroid antibodies – TPOab – to attack the thyroid gland. So if these thyroid antibodies are detected in your blood – with the Paloma home Thyroid Test for hashimoto's, for example – along with low thyroid hormone levels and high TSH levels, there’s a strong likelihood that you may have this autoimmune condition.

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Two out of three people traditionally wait over a year with symptoms for diagnosis. Now, aided by modern testing, Paloma Health doctors are trained in the leading care methods to get you feeling better - faster. Check your symptoms to determine how likely you may be to have hypothyroidism:

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Research-Backed Approach

Medications for Hashimoto's

Treatment for this condition depends on whether it has progressed to mild hypothyroidism, known as subclinical hypothyroidism, or overt hypothyroidism. The standard treatment is a daily thyroid hormone replacement, and there are lifestyle changes, supplements, and complementary alternative medicine options to consider as well.

T4

T4 supplements
Levothyroxine or Synthroid

This drug contains the synthetic form of one thyroid hormone, T4. Levothyroxine is the most commonly prescribed thyroid hormone replacement drug. T4 is the storage hormone and must be converted by the body into T3 to be used by cells.

T3

T3 supplements
Liothyronine or Cytomel

This drug contains the synthetic form of one thyroid hormone, T3. T3 is the active thyroid hormone that works at the cellular level to help with the delivery of oxygen and energy to cells, tissues, and glands throughout the body.

T3 + T4

T4 + T3 combination or Natural desiccated thyroid

Natural Desiccated Thyroid (NDT) is derived from the dried (desiccated) thyroid glands of pigs or cow and provides T3, T4, and other thyroid hormones found in the human thyroid gland.

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Facts and Tips about Hashimoto's

Hashimoto's thyroiditis affects 14 million people in the United States alone, making it not only the most common form of thyroiditis but also the most common disorder in America

The main risk factor for developing Hashimoto's thyroiditis is having a pre-existing autoimmune condition, such as type 1 diabetes.

Women are 7 times more likely to have Hashimoto's thyroiditis than men.

Selenium can help reduce thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies, which when elevated, cause damage to the thyroid

Thyroid hormone replacement therapy is the only treatment available for Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Fortunately, it's highly effective at managing the condition.

Diet changes can help with Hashimoto's. There is no specific diet proven to treat everyone with Hashimoto's. An individualized approach to nutrition is necessary

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What Paloma Health can do for you?

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Thyroid blood test for hashimoto's

Get tested from the comfort of your home and check how well your treatment is working and monitor your antibodies levels

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The best thyroid doctors just for you

With a focus on hashimoto's  and ongoing doctor support, discover the best hypothyroidism care

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Prescription and nutritional guidance

Get a hashimoto's health plan with a prescription + nutritional guidance from nutritionists & thyroid physicians

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Is Paloma Health Right For Me?

Hypothyroidism is a long-term commitment and we’re committed to you. Schedule a free, no-obligation phone consultation with one of our intake specialists to find out more.

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